Bucida buceras L.
This name is accepted, but is also synonymized with the following taxa: Terminalia buceras
Family: Combretaceae
Black Olive,  more...
Bucida buceras image
Little and Wadsworth  
Jones, K., M.B. Thomas and D. Hollister. 2019 In Progress. Native Trees for Community Forests. St. George Village Botanical Garden. St. Croix, US Virgin Islands.
Tall tree to 65' with a broadly rounded, densely foliated crown with nearly horizontal, wide-spreading branches; trunk usually straight and thick, to 3' in diameter.

IDENTIFICATION
Bark: Gray-brown, fissured and slightly rough, becoming thickened and scaly. Leaves: Semi-deciduous, alternate, simple; elliptic to oval, 1" to 3" long, clustered at the ends of short, erect twigs; bluish-green above, yellowishgreen beneath, becoming red under stress. Flowers: Small, inconspicuous, greenish-yellow, on stalks 1 1/2" to 3" long. Flowering February to April. Fruit: Flask-shaped, brownish, finely hairy, 1/4" in length; clustered in long spikes with some fruit deformed into horn-like galls.

GROWTH RATE: Slow to moderate.

SALT TOLERANCE: High.

DROUGHT TOLERANCE: High.

PROPAGATION METHODS: Seeds.

LANDSCAPE USES/LIMITATIONS
Excellent shade and street tree for adverse conditions. Resists salt and wind; very successful as a windbreak. Deep root system does not damage pavements or buildings. Fruits may cause tannin stains on cars and cement; mites may deform the leaves.

USES
Wood is hard with high density, durable in contact with the ground, resistant to dry-wood tennites, and takes a fine polish. Suitable for heavy-duty flooring, construction, and fence posts. Bark was formerly used in tanning. Resinous gum from the bark is boiled and has been used to relieve swollen glands.

CONSERVATION NEEDS
Because of the value of the wood, many of the larger trees have been harvested over the years. This species should be replanted as much as possible.

NATURAL DISTRIBUTION ON ST. CROIX
Somewhat frequent.